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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,563 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> mitchell: tonight, from new orleans, president obama says the government will not forget this city or its people five years after katrina devastated the gulf coast. >> it was a natural disaster, but also a manmade catastrophe. >> mitchell: i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, a force for change. the new top cop here battles a history of corruption inside the new orleans police force. rescue efforts are set to begin to save those trapped chilean miners, as the government seeks a plan to reach them sooner. and pitching in: the legendary music makers of new orleans and how they helped rebuild this city. ♪ captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening from new orleans. august 29, 2010: it has been a cloudy, rainy day here, but no match at all for what this city saw on august 29 five years ago when hurricane katrina rolled in with a vengeance. in the next 30 minutes, we'll take a look at new orleans' past, present and future. but first, the news of the day. president obama ended his vacation this sunday and came here
that this hour. hurricane katrina was a terrible storm but it was the levee failures that flooded new orleans. are the levees safe today. >>> as the combat troops leave iraq, what did the invasion really change? it's hard to believe that was five years ago when hurricane katrina slammed ashore. entire communities along the u.s. gulf coast were decimated. 1,723 people died. the lives of 100,000 more changed forever. some areie reuniting and sharin stories. the president ask firnd first l in new orleans. he is expected to speak at the university in new orleans. jean is there again to take us back to five years ago, and then also help us look forward to what people there are looking forward in terms of rebuilding ask change. what are some of your first thoughts as you return to new orleans, jean? >> well, you can't help but be struck when you're here in the french quarter at how normal things seem here. yes, there are remembrances, for instance, the katrina exhibit is open at one of the museums here just yesterday. but when you go to other parts of the city, when you go to the lower ninth ward,
new orleans. he shared the heart breaking pain was. >> it's almost unbelievable. i can't even think of how to articulate it. >> larry: and now his efforts to repair, rebuild and recover. >> people are living here now and establishing a whole new tradition. so it's pretty exciting for me to walk these streets. >> larry: on the scene in new orleans, the man who believes music revives. ♪ won't your give your lady a fair little smile ♪ ♪ for the beautiful dreams ♪ way down yonder in new orleans ♪ >> larry: harry connick jr. is next on "larry king live." ♪ that's new orleans right there ♪ ♪ this is heaven right here ♪ for the beautiful queens ♪ way down yonder in new orleans ♪ >> larry: it was five years ago this weekend that hurricane katrina ravaged the gulf coast. that storm killed more than 1,800 people, destroyed more than a quarter of a million homes, countless families were shattered economically and emotionally. here to talk about his beloved new orleans tonight is harry connick jr., the grammy and emmy winning performer, has sold more than 20 million albums
>>> from new orleans, five years after hurricane katrina, this is a special edition of "meet the press" with david gregory. substituting today, brian williams. >> august 29, 2005. hurricane katrina touches down on the louisiana coast. the city's levees fail. the next morning nearly 80% of new orleans is under water. a botched government response, a poor local evacuation plan. thousands are left without food, water, shelter or safety, trapped for days as the city is looted and its people suffer. 41,000 people were heroically rescued by u.s. armed forces, many of them brave coast guard pilots, but almost 1800 people are dead, and the storm has left an estimated $75 billion in damages throughout the gulf coast. five years later, what's changed and what hasn't? what lessons were learned? is this city's recovery moving in the right direction? joining us, two of the area's notable political leaders, louisiana senator mary landrieu and her brother, the newly elected mayor of new orleans, rich landrieu. then my interview with actor brad pitt, founder of the make it right foundation,
at the convention center. we're not far away by the city's ninth ward, which was the hardest hit of new orleans when those levees broke. there we saw the pictures of people stranded on rooftops waiting to be rescued. 1,800 people died from katrina, mainly in louisiana and mississippi. remember, this area took a second hit a few weeks later with hurricane rita and it was still struggling to recover where the gulf oil disaster hit just this spring. the recovery here in new orleans has been held by $16.5 billion in federal funds for the region and many other people who love this city, including author tom piazza. he took me on a tour of some of the hardest hit neighborhoods and introduced me to some of his friends along the way. so, tom, this is the 17th street canal. >> here is where one of the most serious breaches happened during katrina. if you had visited t eed this p two or three months after the storm, four months after the storm, six months after the storm, it looked truly like a war zone. just destruction every place, smashed houses, overturned cars. >> how jarring of a contrast is it to have
. >>> and five years later, our return to new orleans. we'll hear from the man mocked for doing a heck of a job. also a son of the city bringing back the music. and a remarkable woman making a back the music. and a remarkable woman making a difference. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands of people from all over the country gathered at the foot of the lincoln memorial in washington today for a rally steeped in patriotism, rooted in the nation's cultural divide and greeted by suspicion. it was organized by provocative conservative talk show host glenn beck who was joined on stage by sarah palin. if that wasn't enough to trigger reaction from activists on the left, the timing and place of the rally certainly was. the anniversary of martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a dream" speech delivered from the same steps 47 years ago today. nbc's tom costello joins us now from washington with more. hello, tom. >> reporter: hi, lester. good evening to you. there is speculation these two might go on the attack today. in effect, they held their fir
reporting live tonight from the lower ninth ward in new orleans. we're here to chronicle a comeback of a neighborhood, of a city, an entire coastal region, really, five years ago today hurricane katrina slammed into the gulf coast with obviously devastating results. this is an aerial photograph of the area where i'm standing right now. this is how it looked five years ago when the levees broke and a barge floated right into the frabd from the adjoining canal. this is what it looks like right now. this is the lower ninth ward, tennessee street, among the streets in this very neighborhood. of course, this is where brad pitt has been putting much of his effort in the make it right foundation. we're going to take you through this neighborhood a little later on and give you a live tour. we all remember the painful images of death and devastation. the winds, the rain and the levy breaks that followed that. much of coastal mississippi literally washed away and much of this city under water for days, even weeks. people here in new orleans are remembering the katrina anniversary in many ways
new orleans here is rachel maddow. >> good evening, rachel. >> good evening, keith. thanks to staying with us for the next hour. we're coming live to you from algie algiers, point in new orleans. and i would like to introduce you to my friend mr. goe, the mississippi river gulf out let. it was hacked through mashes and wetlands to connect the mississippi river and the gulf of mexico by a means shorter than nature intended. building mr. go in the 5950s and 1960s moved more dirt than digging the panama canal. its impact was disaster. mr. go, i have come to believe, is trying to kill new orleans. mr. go channels salt water inland, where it's blamed for killing 100 square miles of wetlands. it is a perfectly designed system for channeling the storm surge from the hurricane in the gulf of mexico right into the dead center of new orleans. you can thank mr. go for dumping a significant portion of lake borgne into st. bernard parish during hurricane katrina. you can thank mr. go for funneling the storm surge all the way up, up, up from the gulf and dumping it into new orleans east and then ch
>>> from new orleans tonight, our exclusive conversation with president obama. five years after katrina, talking about the city's long road back. also what he says tonight about the latest crisis in the gulf, the economy and those questions about his faith. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good evening, we're with you tonight from the gentilly neighborhood of new orleans chtd and if it doesn't look like old new orleans, it's because this particular housing complex, which the president came to see today, is brand new. and like a lot of things here, it's controversial among some because it replaced what was here. well, it was five years ago tonight that katrina had swept through, we knew it was a history-making storm. but we didn't yet know what it would do to this city or how badly places like mississippi had been hit. in fact, here is some of how we covered katrina on our broadcast that very night five years ago. >> just before dawn, katrina heads northwest straight for the coast. >> the eye of the storm is completely over us right
-universal television >>> and good evening, we're with you tonight from the gentilly neighborhood of new orleans chtd and if it doesn't look like old new orleans, it's because this particular housing complex, which the president came to see today, is brand new. and like a lot of things here, it's controversial among some because it replaced what was here. well, it was five years ago tonight that katrina had swept through, we knew it was a history-making storm. but we didn't yet know what it would do to this city or how badly places like mississippi had been hit. in fact, here is some of how we covered katrina on our broadcast that very night five years ago. >> just before dawn, katrina heads northwest straight for the coast. >> the eye of the storm is completely over us right now. with winds gusting in excess of 90 miles per hour. >> you don't have to go far to find scenes that look like they're right out of a disaster movie. >> these uprooted trees, the street signs, the washed-up legal documents and a bottle of medicine. >> in the aftermath of katrina, streets were filled with debris. >> had where
this -- how new orleans recovers from this is behind comprehension. >> so much gain. >> people coming back strong but need a lot of h help. >> heartbreak. >> it was never always going to be whole. >> and hope years after hurricane katrina came barreling ashore and changed the landscape forever. >> i put -- i put -- i know one thing, i'm here to stay. >> tonight, a special look back as the gulf moves forward five years later. plus, they came to help. but stayed to learn and to live. >> seeing people who we have helped build their house turn around and want to help us with other people's houses, that was really a turning point. >> tonight, the story of the volunteers still giving their time and getting back much more in return. we'll have the rest of today's top stories in just a moment. but we begin tonight with trace gallagher who joins us live in new orleans, jackson square as we mark five years since hurricane katrina roared ashore, the storm that changed the lives of people along the gulf coast forever, trace. >> and julie, as the bells toll behind me we are live in jackson square which
's head back to new orleans now and john roberts. john, you're right, it is strange to drive through the streets of new orleans. there are even some of those red "xs" that we saw so often right after the floodwaters came into the city of new orleans indicating that this house was going to be torn down. there are still homes with those marks on them today. >> they're not just homes with those mark on them. there are thousands upon thousands of structures, carol, that are like they were five years ago. like time has just sort of frozen them the way they were right after the storm. just want to let you know where we are. we're live this morning in the lower ninth ward of new orleans, the ward hit so hard by hurricane katrina. to show you a tale of two cities, of two recoveries this morning. five years after katrina, there are plenty of glimmers of hope. but as can you see all around me -- i know it is a little bit dark -- many places are like they're frozen in time. there is a church behind me used as a nursery prior to hurricane katrina. it is still as it was five years ago. there are
. allison plyer, shannon jones, and later, steven striffler of the university of new orleans on rebuilding the community. "washington journal" is next. >> i have just gotten word from the media that there is over 1000 people here today. >> somebody said, why are you marching? they call as trouble makers occurr. but now the folks that used to criticize us for marching are trying to have a march themselves. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] ♪ host: good morning. thousands lined the mall and the lincoln memorial yesterday in an event organized by glenn beck. the reverend al sharpton commemorated the speech by dr. martin luther king with a march. we'll get your thoughts, especially as we go into midterm elections. the president has concluded a 10 day vacation at martha's vineyard. the president speaks today. live coverage at 3:00 p.m. on c- span. it was five years ago that hurricane katrina hit the gulf coast leaving its scars on new orleans and the region. we will look at the schools, the economy, a
. is with us tomorrow night. >> larry: time now for "ac 360." >>> good evening again from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musician's village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others, giving them a place to live. it's built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. 82 homes and duplexes built here. one of the many signs rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight and check in on the situation with those fema trailers and mobile homes. who can forget them? we'll talk to a couple who bought their trailer from fema, but a purchase they're paying for with their health. we tested it and found it highly contaminated with formaldehyde, something the couple says fema knew and pushed the purchase anyway. making this city right for generations to come. looks like they're on the right track. we'll talk to some kids at a charter school here. keeping them honest. five years since katrina. it's easy to rewrite history and easy to forget the disasters that made a natural disaster into a man-m
. we are live tonight from algiers point, a neighborhood in new orleans just across the mississippi river, the wide, wide river from the french qu t quarter and downtown new orleans. one of the things that is nice about this neighborhood is it gives you a great view of the downtown. i always thought algiers was pretty in its own right. a house in this neighborhood would cost you 40% more than it would have before hurricane katrina and the catastrophic flooding that followed the storm when the levees broke. this neighborhood, though algiers point did not flood. they had wind damage and went through a hurricane, after all. but the water didn't raise here. yet this is still an american neighborhood that is surviving katrina in some ways. still surviving. we are here for a couple of days to see what surviving katrina still looks like here in this great place here in new orleans. >>> the original name for what i'm standing is the calliope housing project. it then became the b.w. cooper housing project. it should be noted it's not the b.w. cooper housing project anymore. it's not anythin
in new orleans. and every sunday a statewide call to worship. we will is no doubt the chant from the rest of the nfl. i'm don lemon live in new orleans. we leave you tonight with the sweet sounds of amanda shaw, cajun fiddle player, and she's good. thanks for watching. good night. >>> good evening again from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musician's village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others by giving them a place to live. it's been built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. some of whom are here tonight along with americorps workers and others. there's 82 homes and duplexes built here. 90 more homes under construction in the neighborhood. one of the many signs of rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight. we'll also check in on the situation with the fema trailers and mobile homes. we'll talk to a couple who bought their trailer from fema, but it's a purchase they're paying for with their health. we tested the mobile home and found it highly contamina
new orleans native, star of the hbo hit series tremay, and president of the pontchartrain park corporation, wendell pierce. long time journalist garland robinette of wwl radio and historian and author douglas brinkley. but first, and good morning from new orleans for this special edition of "meet the press." we should set the scene here. if you know the town, we're in the former bella luna, and these days it is back and prospering as a restaurant. here in our studio space, we have nothing but landrieus. with us, louisiana senior senator mary landrieu and her brother, mayor rich landrieu, who took office almost four years -- four months ago. i almost made you older. let's put things at the top here. we've come down here so many times in the past five years, i could probably accept mail delivery by now, and you pick up on the local quarqs. when you say down here that hurricane katrina was the biggest new orleans disaster ever, you're not usually able to get the sentence out and they say, wait a minute, the levees broke. and then they say, but you're living below sea level. that's
. >>> this is msnbc's special coverage, live from new orleans. here's tamron hall. >>> good afternoon, everyone. live in the french quarter in new orleans and welcome to our special coverage of katrina. at this moment, five years ago, katrina was still gaining strength in the gulf of mexico. people had no idea what it would do to this historic city and this region. katrina finally hit here five years ago this sunday, as a category 3 storm with 125-mile-per-hour winds, it left 80% of new orleans under water. 1.5 million people were evacuated in the aftermath, 1,800 people would die in the gulf region. the lower ninth ward, not far from where we are is the hard e hit part of new orleans when the levees failed. we saw horrifying pictures of people stranded on rooftops waiting to be rest cued. according to a new estimate, about 25,000 people who lived there before katrina, only 1,000 have returned to what's called the nine. thousands of people sought shelter at the new orleans convention center and the superdome, but they ended up stranded there for weeks, with little food and no water. at least six deat
>>> on the broadcast tonight from new orleans, stalling out. the economy isn't growing nor is the american family. tonight, two signs of our times. >>> life under ground. an extraordinary video message has arrived from those trapped miners. can they possibly hold on until christmas to be rescued? >>> and making a difference. new orleans five years after katrina. we'll look at those working so hard here at things like education and health care. >>> and you may know him as brad pitt, but around here in the lower ninth ward he's known as the guy making new homes available for families. the guy making new homes available for families. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. this is it. we are back in the lower ninth ward tonight, the one iconic post katrina new orleans neighborhood people have heard about all over the world. the old neighborhood was all still here in place five years ago tonight. that's because katrina was still offshore in the gulf, bearing down, but still at least two days out. the flood wall behind us is new
>>> on our broadcast tonight from new orleans, five years later. after katrina, the state of this city and the entire gulf coast, the state of the oil spill and the rhythm of everyday life after the storm. the rhythm of everyday life after the storm. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >> announcer: hurricane katrina, five years later. this is a special edition of nbc "nightly news" with brian williams. reporting tonight from new orleans. >>> good evening from the french quarter in new orleans where five years ago tonight it was still a few days off. we could see it out there. we knew katrina was a big one, but we had no idea what it would do to this city and this region. back then when the storm hit, it covered an area of 90,000 square miles. 80% of this great, historic city was underwater. 1.5 million people were affected in that storm's aftermath and, worst of all, of course, more than 1,800 deaths at the hands of katrina. things these days here are getting much better, in part thanks to a fortune, a potential pool of $16.7 billion i
from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musicians' village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others by giving them a place to live. it's been built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. some of whom who are here tonight. along with americorps workers and others. there are 82 homes and duplexes built here. 90 more homes under construction in the neighborhood. one of the many signs rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight and check in on the situation with those fema trailers and mobile homes. who can forget them? we'll talk to a couple who bought their trailer from fema, but it's a purchase they're paying for with their health. we tested the mobile home, found it highly contaminated with formaldehyde, something the couple says fema knew, and pushed through the purchase anyway. >>> educating the kids of new orleans. it was what some call the biggest experiment and the greatest chance for making this city right for generations to come. looks like they're on the right tra
hour for you on cnn. we're reporting on the from the lower ninth ward of new orleans where five years ago today hurricane katrina crashed ashore. look at this aerial photo of where i'm standing now. this is how it looked five years ago. this is what it looks like right now. this is the lower ninth ward. we are on tennessee street where brad pitt is building a number of homes here through his make it right foundation. this is what the city of new orleans needs to look like and be more dense than this in the coming years. we all remember the painful images of death and devastation. the winds, the rains and the floods that followed. most of coastal mississippi literally washed away. much of the city underwater for days. people in new orleans are remembering the storms in many ways, including a special church service in the city's lakeview neighborhood. the church was among the many buildings inundated by floodwaters. president barack obama was also in town marking the anniversary with a message for the people of new orleans. >> i don't have to tell you there's still too many vacant and o
katrina made landfall in the gulf coast, hitting mississippi, alabama, and of course new orleans, leaving those states devastated by this monster storm that roared into this region, taking 1,800 lives, displacing more than a million people, many of whom are still trying to get home. good morning, everyone. i'm tamron hall in new orleans marxing five years since hurricane katrina hit. >> good morning, tamron. i'm alex witt here at msnbc world headquarters in new york. we'll have the top stories for you, including the situation in the atlantic with two hurricanes, danielle and earl. >>> also, president obama's busy week ahead beginning in just a few hours with his trip to new orleans, and then his upcoming speech on iraq. >>> but we'll begin this hour with you, tamron, in new orleans. >> thank you, alex. hurricane katrina hit here five years ago today, and this morning we are taking a revealing look at the lasting impact and the progress made as this vital part of our country continues to recover. i'm reporting from artillery park. it's, in fact, just across from jackson square. you see st.
. >> every person is hereby ordered to immediately evacuate the city of new orleans. >>> good evening. i'm brian williams. it was the last weekend of summer five years ago. a lot of americans were on vacation. they might have heard something about a big hurricane possibly even aiming at new orleans, but there have been hurricanes before. of course, it then turned out that there had never been anything like katrina before. if you watched any of our coverage five years ago then you know we were there for the storm. i was inside the superdome, and we stayed in that city for those first awful days and weeks. and in the months and years that have followed since, we've made dozens of return visits and we will continue to. after i returned from katrina, a producer here came up with the idea to sit me down and record my thoughts on videotape as a record of what happened there. everything, the anger and the despair and some awful memories. so what you're about to see is hard to watch at times. it's a kind of time capsule, so we don't forget what it was like when katrina hit new orleans and the gu
in new orleans? 202-628-1084. long-term, if we were to sit here five years from now, what issues do you think we will talk about? guest: it is going to be the economy. katrina funds have buoyed our economy. then we were hit with a recession. we lost 1%, compared to 4% nationwide. then we had the oil spill. it points out the unfinished business of katrina. one, are wetlands have been eroding. congress approved a plan to rebuild it, but they never funded it. this is a state that has a budget of $14 billion, so to allocate $1 billion for rebuilding wetlands demonstrates a strong commitment. it will take multi-billion dollars. they have en hurt because of the with the army corps of engineers build levees and kept it from flooding and replenishing the wetlands over time. we need to rebuild them. i think the country is aware of the importance of our wetlands as the breeding ground, the nurturing area for the whole gulf coast and our seafood and wildlife. we are hopeful that there may be some funding after the oil spill from bp to help rebuild our wetlands. any number with a "b" in it might co
start recovery. i don't want us to think that oh , this happened to new orleans and this is not a part of our reality today. but as i mentioned earlier, we are vulnerable, we all are. and hurricane season for new orleans and louisiana come once a year. we know. june first-november one. we know that earthquake season is everyday. you never know. i don't want you to have blinders on to think this is not a part of reality right now. because it can happen. so, begin to organize today. this is just an example of a meeting flyer that we had in broadmoore post katrina, galvanizing our residents having festivals to get our people engaged and involved. some of the other things that you can do today is start developing repopulation strategies. in a disaster how will you find your people and determine what their needs and bear yers are? these are things you can have in place right now. but for broadmoore we had to do this in the aftermath. i can't stress to you enough to make sure that you incorporate your vision and your strategies. block captains aided us in our recovery. block captains are peo
'm don lemon live from new orleans. fifth anniversary of hurricane katrina. i'll see you back here at 10:00 p.m. eastern. i'm going to show you some sights and sounds of new orleans. it is a beautiful evening. it started out to be a very rainy day but it ended on a beautiful note. there you see the artists in jackson square painting. there's a who dat nation, talking about the new orleans saints. "in katrina's wake" is up next. see you back here at 10:00. >>> good evening again from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musician's village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others by giving them a place to live. it's been built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. some of whom who are here tonight. there are 82 homes and duplexes built here. 90 more homes under construction in the neighborhood. one of the many signs rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight and check in on the situation with those fema trailers and mobile homes. who can forget them? we'll talk to a couple wh
katrina can devastated new orleans and the gulf. the coast guard rescued more than 33,000 people in new orleans. many trapped on rooftops or being rescued in boats. and yet somehow as we watched this desperate scene unfold, government officials were telling us everything is okay. >> again, i want to thank you all for doing a heck of a job. the fema director is working 24 -- they're work 24 hour as day. >> five years later, the arm core of engineers is building new levees it claims are stronger. but the two men in charge at the time claim fema has not made those necessary changes. in case another mega storm strikes. >> i don't see any major changes that we have done as a country. the fema has new people, but it's still operating pretty much the same. >> people find it shock, but i agree with the mayor because i think that the systemic failures that we have have not been addressed. >> michael brown, the former head of fema. we have a host of reporters blanketing the gulf for our coverage here on msnbc. janet, i guess the big question is what chhas changed? >> reporter: a lot of people hav
in new orleans without hearing that. i am live in new orleans. we will see you back here tomorrow at 6, 7, and 10:00 p.m. eastern. president obama will be here. we will leave you with those sights right here. i will see you tomorrow night. thanks for joining us. good night. >>> good evening again from new orleans. five years since katrina. we're coming to you tonight from musician's village, a new complex built in the upper ninth ward to honor local musicians and others by giving them a place to live. it's been built by volunteers from habitat for humanity. some of whom who are here tonight. there are 82 homes and duplexes built here. 90 more homes under construction in the neighborhood. one of the many signs rebuilding and rebirth in this city. we'll show you more of it coming up tonight and check in on the situation with those fema trailers and mobile homes. who can forget them? we'll talk to a couple who bought their trailer from fema, but it's a purchase they're paying for with their health. we tested the mobile home, found it highly contaminated with formaldehyde, something t
have the outstanding mayor of new orleans, mitch landrieu. [cheers] we have the better-looking and younger senator from louisiana, mary landrieu. i believe that senator david vitter is here. right here. hold on a second now. we have congressman joe -- is here. congressman charlie -- is here. [cheers] congressman steve -- is here. secretary of housing and urban development who has been working tirelessly down here in louisiana, shaun donovan. we got our epa administrator, lisa jackson, here. home girl. fema istrator of the mal here. the person who is heading up our community service efforts across the country, patrick corbin cent, is here. the surgeonown, xavier grad, ieren might add, is here. we very proud to have these republics servants here. it is wonderful to be back in new orleans. and it is a great honor -- it is a great honor. you can see me now? ok. it is a great honor to be back at xavier university. inspiring to spend time with people who have demonstrated what it means to persevere in the face of tragedy, to rebuild in the face of ruin. i am grateful to jade
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,563 (some duplicates have been removed)